How are SEN Pupils Taught?

All pupils learn differently and have strengths and weaknesses.  At Warden House we strongly believe that emphasis should be on the strengths of a pupil and we use this knowledge to provide timely and sensitive support when needed.

 

For example:

Pupil A loves doing and making and can always remember what work has been completed.  In contrast when learning his sounds they are not retained and frustration and lack of progress is evident.  His  Class Teacher has recognised this and has ensured that his phonics learning is practically based, from making letter shapes with different resources e.g. pipe cleaners, to writing in a variety of ways e.g. chalk.  Pupil A has found it easier to remember his phonics and has recognised his own style of learning.

 

Pupil B finds it difficult to listen and retain information and is consequently struggling to finish her work and remember tasks set. Pupil B is very good at visual work e.g. drawing and retelling stories from pictures. Her Class Teacher provides Pupil B with a visual support for her work with the small steps clearly indicated for her to follow until the task is complete.  If Pupil B forgets where she is she can return to her visual support which clearly identifies her next step.  Pupil B is now finishing work increasingly independently and learning to

self manage her tasks visually.

 

Class differentiation is a key management technique when supporting pupils with SEN.  All lessons can be differentiated to support all learners and allow them to be fully included in class whilst keeping to the topic of the

lessons being taught. 

 

Examples of differentiation could be:

 -     individual learning outcomes

-      shorter tasks

-      different wording of tasks

-      pictorial support

-      expected outcomes and marking

-      adult support

-      peer group support

 

Pupil support is assessed and managed on an individual basis and what works for one pupil may not be right for the next, even if they present with similar difficulties.  Class teachers will try different styles of support for pupils, continuously measuring impact and pupils well-being on a lesson by lesson basis.  At Warden House provision for pupils, whether by taught sessions or physical resources, is flexible and will often be reviewed or altered midterm as the individual child requires.